Cataract & Lasik Surgery

Cataract Surgery

Cataract surgery removes the cloudy lens and replaces it with a clear artificial lens called an intraocular lens (IOL).

We perform a minimally invasive, small-incision, no-stitch cataract surgery called phacoemulsification (“phaco”) surgery. First, the eye is numbed with anesthesia. Then a tiny incision is made in the eye to make room for a small ultrasonic probe. This probe breaks up, or emulsifies, the cloudy lens into tiny pieces. The pieces are then suctioned out through the probe.

After the cloudy lens has been removed, a new artificial lens, or IOL, is implanted in the eye. With the recent advance of foldable IOLs , artificial lenses can be implanted through the same small incision from the phaco procedure. We now offer special Multifocal intraocular lens implantation following cataract removal, providing the patient with both distance and near reading ability.

LASIK

LASIK (refractive surgery) is a combined surgical and laser procedure which improves vision safely and precisely by reshaping the cornea to correct nearsightedness (myopia), farsightedness (hyperopia), and  astigmatism.

LASIK offers many improvements over other refractive surgery procedures. These include little or no post-operative discomfort, immediate vision improvement, and the ability to drive or return to work quickly—sometimes as soon as the next day. Most patients require no corrective eyewear after surgery (although patients over 45 often need reading glasses).

You might consider consider refractive surgery if you:

  • Wish to decrease your dependence on glasses and contacts
  • Have become contact lens intolerant
  • Are free of eye disease
  • Can accept the inherent risks and potential side effects of the procedure
  • Have the appropriate refractive error

Call today to schedule your consultation and find out you are a candidate for LASIK. Soon you could be tossing away your glasses or contact lenses and enjoying the freedom of clear vision.

Am I a candidate?

Not everyone is a good candidate for LASIK. When you come in for an evaluation, your eyes will be examined to determine whether LASIK or another refractive procedure is appropriate for you, and whether you are at risk for any complications.

The ideal LASIK candidate:

  • Is over 18 years old;
  • Has had stable vision for at least six months;
  • Has a healthy cornea thick enough for a flap;
  • Has refractive error(s) that fall within the treatable range;
  • Does not have a disease or condition that could impair the procedure or healing process;
  • Has been educated about the procedure including its risks and benefits.
  • Understands that the goal of surgery is to improve vision and reduce dependence on glasses and contact lenses.

During your consultation, your surgeon will review your eyesight and discuss whether LASIK is right for you.

Choosing a Surgeon

Choosing to undergo eye surgery is a difficult decision with long-lasting consequences. You will live with the results of your surgery for years to come. That’s why it’s so important to find an experienced surgeon equipped with the latest technology to ensure that you enjoy the best surgical result possible, with improved vision and no complications. You probably don’t want to put your eyesight in the hands of an inexperienced surgeon or budget LASIK practice.

Honesty

We don’t pressure our patients into undergoing a procedure that isn’t right for them. Every patient interested in LASIK is given an extensive evaluation to determine whether LASIK is right for him or her. During the consultation, the patient and surgeon have a frank discussion about the advantages and risks of having laser vision correction. Only then is the patient accepted as a pre-operative LASIK candidate.

Caring

Unlike high-volume LASIK “factories,” we take the time to ensure that every patient receives the best care and attention. The procedure is quick—about 15 minutes per eye—but we don’t rush our patients in and out of the office to make room for the next one in line.

Important Facts About Refractive Surgery

  • More than 95% of people who have had refractive surgery can pass a standard driver’s license exam that requires a visual acuity of at least 20/40 without glasses or contacts.
  • Additional enhancement surgeries may be required after refractive surgery.
  • Fitting contact lenses may be difficult or impossible because of corneal changes following refractive surgery.
  • Reading glasses may still be necessary for middle aged or older patients.

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